The Wanderer

As I walked through the wilderness of this world …

Posts Tagged ‘“The Brokenhearted Evangelist”

An interview on “The Brokenhearted Evangelist”

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I have just enjoyed an opportunity to speak with Pastor Kevin Boling on his radio program, Knowing The Truth, about The Brokenhearted Evangelist and related issues.

The interview was recorded and is now available for your listening pleasure at SermonAudio.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 8 March 2012 at 19:16

“The Brokenhearted Evangelist”

with 8 comments

Hurrah and huzzah! The Brokenhearted Evangelist rolls from the presses (do books still roll from presses?) to the acknowledging grunts of the three people who have pre-ordered it.

Here’s the publisher’s blurb:

With a “gutless orthodoxy,” Christians today quickly affirm biblical truth regarding evangelism and mission, but, author Jeremy Walker reminds us, “we cannot pretend that we know and believe the truth about men, souls, heaven, hell, and salvation unless it is making a difference in the way we think, feel, pray, speak, and act.” How do Christians develop this sense of urgency to see lost sinners saved? What motivates our evangelism? We must have the character of the brokenhearted evangelist, the David of Psalm 51, who recognizes the greatness of his own sin, looks to God for forgiveness, then recognizes his undeniable obligation to teach transgressors God’s ways. In an engaging style and with pastoral warmth, Walker urges Christians to exercise their obligation and privilege to teach transgressors God’s ways, providing both spiritual truth and practical guidance for carrying out this necessary gospel duty.

There are five chapters in the book, and you can read a sample by clicking the link for chapter one:

  1. Am I Willing? Our Undeniable Obligation
  2. Am I Effective? Our Necessary Equipment
  3. Am I Committed? Our Appointed Means
  4. Am I Focused? Our Declared Aim
  5. Am I Fruitful? Our Great Expectation

Several esteemed men have been willing to read it and provide endorsements:

John MacArthur: “In recent years providence has brought a number of people into my life and ministry who are passionate about evangelism. Some of them are especially keen to win friends, fellow-workers, and family to Christ; others are engaged in various kinds of open-air evangelism, bringing the gospel to people they have never met before. I thank God for all of them and the passion that drives them. This excellent book by Jeremy Walker explains the biblical principles that underlie and provoke such passion, reminding us that time is short, the need is urgent, the laborers are few, and the fields are white unto harvest.”

Conrad Mbewe: “Jeremy Walker’s book is in the tradition of the Puritan classic, Joseph Alleine’s Alarm to the Unconverted, but this is more Jeremy Walker’s Alarm to the Converted. It is a pleasant surprise, coming as it does from a part of our world where Christianity has largely entered a ‘garrison’ (bunker) mode. The book, based on Psalm 51:13, is not meant simply to teach us about evangelism; it demands a verdict. He enlists the help of the great soul winners in history to reinforce his appeals. Even before I finished reading the book, I was already asking myself whether my heart was truly broken about the lost around me—and if it is, what am I doing about it?”

Paul Washer:The Broken Hearted Evangelist will refresh, strengthen, and equip the most timid saint for the work of soul winning. Jeremy Walker’s consideration of evangelism from the perspective of Psalm 51 is like fresh water drawn from a new well. He does not merely exhort us to greater faithfulness in evangelism and then leave us bewildered and guilty. Instead, he takes us to the very fountain from which all true motivation and strength for evangelism springs forth—the gospel and its glorious impact upon our own lives.”

At the moment, it is available from Reformation Heritage Books and Westminster Bookstore and Amazon.com. If you are interested, please take time to order and read it. Many thanks.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 7 February 2012 at 17:17

Points of note

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For those who may be interested, and who don’t snigger at what might charitably be called “late adopters,” this blog now has a Facebook page (see sidebar also). If you have a moment, please hit the like button on the sidebar or the page to follow the blog.

Also, I have continued to chip away on the pastoral theology page, and I have half a shelf of new books to work on, so please do check out the list of reviews from time to time.

Speaking of books, The Brokenhearted Evangelist is due to be published in a few days (the whisper is that it should be on the shelf either on 10th or 20th of this month). RHB have it available on their website for $11 at the moment. Might I encourage you to bag a copy at some point? More news will follow when I have it.

Mike Riccardi does a good job of herding the elephants, providing a useful chronological outline of the events and discussion before, during and after Elephant Room 2. This may yet prove to be a defining moment in the New Calvinist movement, as men are obliged to walk in the right direction or the wrong one (whether by plain approval or by fudging the issue). If you still care about the nitty-gritty of the process, as opposed to the principle, it’s worth looking at. What is slightly interesting is the re-emergence of the word ‘trajectory.’ A couple of years ago, when invited to comment on certain big players, other big players backed off and endorsed – if not quite the man and his ministry in its entirety – at the very least the “trajectory” they were on, which at the time might have been considered fairly positive. What is noticeable by its absence in some is a refusal to track the current trajectory of some men and say that it is either absolutely unacceptable or that it bodes much ill. It would be tragic to see men who have earned a reputation for the defence of the faith in recent years go down as the men who failed to draw the lines when the lines needed to be drawn.

UPDATE: Messrs Carson and Keller have provided a lengthy, interesting but largely inconclusive overview of issues they believe to be related to this debate here. I appreciate the information, and they have certainly demonstrated their erudition, but I am left a little confused about what they are trying to achieve. It is a substantially boneless piece, providing no definition, drawing no lines, reaching no conclusions. It is disappointing to see men who have a platform of unusual influence, and from whom a robust declaration of what matters and why it matters might have been expected, appearing to fudge the opportunity. I hope that more will be forthcoming upon further reflection, and that there will be some acknowledgements of failure and disappointment as well as some pontifications about dichotomies and tensions.

Finally, I thought that some might be interested to know of a recent introductory series on the church of God which I completed in the church here in Crawley. You can view the whole series here or check out individual sermons as follows:

  1. The nature of the church
  2. The identity of the church (1)
  3. The identity of the church (2)
  4. The identity of the church (3)
  5. The purpose of the church
  6. The calling of the church (1) Principle and pattern
  7. The calling of the church (2) Pursuit and process
  8. The worship of the church (1) Its object and spirituality
  9. The worship of the church (2) Its boundaries and liberties
  10. The government of the church
  11. The mark of the church
  12. The bond of the church
  13. The privilege of the church
  14. The discipline of the church (1)
  15. The discipline of the church (2)
  16. The rule of the church
  17. The delight of the church
  18. The gathering of the church (1)
  19. The gathering of the church (2)
  20. The vigour of the church
  21. The mission of the church
  22. The destiny of the church

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 3 February 2012 at 10:09

“The Brokenhearted Evangelist”

with one comment

The new book, The Brokenhearted Evangelist, is hopefully not too far from publication. As an appetite-whetter, Reformation Heritage Books have provided a sample of the preface and first chapter which can be downloaded here.

The publisher’s blurb reads as follows:

With a “gutless orthodoxy,” Christians today quickly affirm biblical truth regarding evangelism and mission, but, author Jeremy Walker reminds us, “we cannot pretend that we know and believe the truth about men, souls, heaven, hell, and salvation unless it is making a difference in the way we think, feel, pray, speak, and act.” How do Christians develop this sense of urgency to see lost sinners saved? What motivates our evangelism? We must have the character of the brokenhearted evangelist, the David of Psalm 51, who recognizes the greatness of his own sin, looks to God for forgiveness, then recognizes his undeniable obligation to teach transgressors God’s ways. In an engaging style and with pastoral warmth, Walker urges Christians to exercise their obligation and privilege to teach transgressors God’s ways, providing both spiritual truth and practical guidance for carrying out this necessary gospel duty.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 17 January 2012 at 11:38

Towards publication . . .

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Now that the cover competition is over (it’s likely to appear something like the picture yonder), it looks as if the text is close to being ready (one last review to do), and some more kind words in endorsement have arrived. This time, Paul Washer of HeartCry Missionary Society was kind enough to add his voice to those of John MacArthur and Conrad Mbewe. Paul said:

The Brokenhearted Evangelist will refresh, strengthen, and equip the most timid saint for the work of soul winning. Jeremy Walker’s consideration of evangelism from the perspective of Psalm 51 is like fresh water drawn from a new well. He does not merely exhort us to greater faithfulness in evangelism and then leave us bewildered and guilty. Instead, he takes us to the very fountain from which all true motivation and strength for evangelism springs forth – the gospel and its glorious impact upon our own lives.

I am very grateful to these men for taking the time to read the manuscript, and their readiness to endorse it. Hopefully one or two more worthy voices will be added to the chorus before publication.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Monday 28 November 2011 at 05:00

Covering your bases

with 5 comments

As regular readers might know, there is another book forthcoming, called The Brokenhearted Evangelist. Reformation Heritage Books, in a fit of generosity, have given YOU, the people, an opportunity to contribute to this landmark event in the history of publishing by voting on cover designs. You can head over to their Facebook page to vote on your favourite of three covers, with a chance to win a free copy of the book.

If the voting starts to turn against me, I shall post a further plea asking you to avoid the cover I like least!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 2 November 2011 at 19:25

Some book bits

with one comment

I am giving a little time at present to editing what I hope will be a shortly-forthcoming volume from Reformation Heritage Books. American usage has dictated a very subtle change of title – “You better drop that hyphen if you know what’s good for you, punk!” – and so we are now working on The Brokenhearted Evangelist. In addition to John MacArthur’s kind commendation, Conrad Mbewe has also been kind enough to offer this endorsement:

Jeremy Walker’s book is in the tradition of the Puritan classic, Joseph Alleine’s Alarm to the Unconverted, but this is more Jeremy Walker’s Alarm to the Converted. It is a pleasant surprise, coming as it does from a part of our world where Christianity has largely entered a “garrison” (bunker) mode. The book, based on Psalm 51:13, is not meant simply to teach us about evangelism; it demands a verdict. He enlists the help of the great soul winners in history to reinforce his appeals. Even before I finished reading the book, I was already asking myself whether my heart was truly broken about the lost around me – and if it is, what am I doing about it?

Furthermore, there may be some assistance required – perhaps in the form of a competition – in selecting an appropriate cover for the book. More news on that as we get closer to publication, I hope.

Finally, I intend to finish the short reviews of pastoral books before long (and already have a couple more to add to those completed). Neither have I forgotten the promised competition in celebration of the initial completion of the list. Part of the delay is because I am waiting to identify and receive the prizes. So, please continue to watch this space, and we will see what we can come up with.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 25 October 2011 at 10:16

Book news

with 3 comments

Books old: Reformation Heritage Books have released A Portrait of Paul as an ebook. It is selling for $9.99 (approximately six of your earth pounds together with about fifty of your terrestrial pence). I am waiting for my own ‘copy’ as it were, but I am presuming that it is readily available and functional for such devices as the Kindle and others.

Books new: God willing, a second volume will be rolling from the presses in January of this coming year. The working title is The Brokenhearted Evangelist, and the first few endorsements are rolling in. More news will follow, but – for appetite-whetting purposes – here is John MacArthur’s kind commendation:

In recent years providence has brought a number of people into my life and ministry who are passionate about evangelism. Some of them are especially keen to win friends, fellow-workers, and family to Christ; others are engaged in various kinds of open-air evangelism, bringing the gospel to people they have never met before. I thank God for all of them and the passion that drives them. This excellent book by Jeremy Walker explains the biblical principles that underlie and provoke such passion, reminding us that time is short, the need is urgent, the laborers are few, and the fields are white unto harvest.

I will attempt to keep you posted as work progresses. There is plenty of other writing in the tube, so I press on!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 24 September 2011 at 08:20

Broken-hearted evangelists

with one comment

I have been listening to the latest Connected Kingdom podcast from “the odd couple,” David Murray and Tim Challies. I was intrigued to hear them discussing the fall-out from Rob Bell’s new book, and asking whether or not the wider church really believes in hell anyway. Surely, they reason, if we really believed in hell we would be doing more to take the gospel to the lost?

Over the last few days I have been putting the finishing touches to the manuscript of what I hope will be my next book, with the working title The Broken-Hearted Evangelist. I finally submitted that manuscript to the publisher yesterday, and – though I have no idea how long it will be before it is available – it is intended, at least in part, to address the issue of a right response to the realities of judgement and salvation.

As a taster, here is the draft preface of the current manuscript. Not sure how much of it will survive the editing process, but hopefully it will give a sense of the nature and scope and direction of the book. I will keep you posted on progress, God willing.

There is nothing that more glorifies God than the accomplishment of His saving purposes in His Son, Jesus Christ. Do you know and believe that? There is nothing more important to a man than the destiny of his immortal soul. Do you know and believe that? There is a heaven to be gained and there is a hell from which to flee, and our relationship to the Lord Jesus is the difference between the two. Do you know and believe that? Only those who repent of their sins and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ will be saved. Do you know and believe that? The saints of God are sent by God into the world in order to preach that gospel by which sinners are saved. Do you know and believe that?

It is easy to answer such questions with a gutless orthodoxy. Lively faith in Christ grasps spiritual realities in a way that galvanizes the believer. All truth – whether of God’s grace to us or of our duty to God – bears fruit in us only insofar as we are connected to Christ by faith. This being so, says John Owen,

he alone understands divine truth who doeth it: John vii.17. There is not, therefore, any one text of Scripture which presseth our duty unto God, that we can so understand as to perform that duty in an acceptable manner, without an actual regard unto Christ, from whom alone we receive ability for the performance of it, and in or through whom alone it is accepted with God.

John Owen, Christologia in The Works of John Owen (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1965), 1:82.

We cannot pretend that we have understood divine truth unless we are living it. We cannot pretend that we know and believe the truth about men and souls and heaven and hell and salvation unless it is making a difference to the way in which we think and feel and pray and speak and act.

A vigorous and practical concern for the lost, growing out of a desire for God’s glory in man’s salvation, is an eminently Christlike thing and a hallmark of healthy Christianity. By such a standard, there are many unhealthy churches and unhealthy Christians; by such a standard, and to my great grief, I am not well myself.

While I accept that there can be an unbalanced and crippling expectation and even unbiblical obsession with some aspects of evangelism and “mission” (as the portentous modern singular would have it!), there is an opposite and perhaps, in our day, greater danger that believers and churches enjoying possession of a great deposit of truth nevertheless do not know it. If they did, they would be doing something.

It is very easy to be up in arms, for example, about current assaults on what can so calmly be described as the doctrine of hell. “Of course there is a hell!” we protest, offended and disturbed that someone could deny what is so plainly written in the Word of God. Is there a hell? What difference has it made? What have you done differently because there is a hell? Is its reality driving our thoughts, words and deeds? Many of us who have entered the kingdom have come perilously close to the flames of the pit. We have felt its fire, and yet we have, perhaps, forgotten that from which we have been delivered. The urgency with which we fled to Christ ourselves has perhaps been replaced with a casual awareness of spiritual reality that never energizes us to do anything for those who are themselves in danger of eternal punishment.

The same could be said of heaven, of Christ’s atonement for sinners, of God’s grace and mercy, of the freeness of the gospel, of the excellence of salvation. “Yes, yes, yes,” the monotonous ticking off of doctrines received continues. But what difference does it make to you and to me?

It is my heartfelt contention that the truths we believe ought to make the people of God broken-hearted evangelists. My prayer for this book is that the Lord Christ would make its author and its readers truly to understand the gospel duty which God has laid upon His church, and therefore to make us willing to perform the work we have been given to do, and by His strength to make us able to do it, to the praise of the glory of God’s grace.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 11 March 2011 at 12:12

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