The Wanderer

As I walked through the wilderness of this world …

Archive for the ‘Missiology and evangelism’ Category

Living in Athens

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A couple of times a month, as God enables us, the church which I serve attempts to proclaim the gospel in the centre of our town, preaching in the open air, handing out tract-invitations, and engaging in conversation with those who have a few moments to spare. Today was one of those occasions, and it gave a fairly representative glimpse into the spiritual battleground on which we are fighting.

On our arrival, we found the Jehovah’s Witnesses established just along from our usual patch. They have been unusually active in our area recently, and have begun to employ some new techniques and hardware – well-designed portable leaflet stands which are put up in prominent or busy places (just outside bus, train and tube stations seem to be favourites, though obviously not limited to them) with a couple of well-spoken Witnesses manning their stations.

As we began to set up and hand out our invitations some distance away, a passing gentleman pointed out to me that we had a little competition. Trying to seize the opportunity, I plunged into what became a conversation with a French philosopher of sorts (literally French, philosophical by inclination), a thoroughgoing humanist for whom all was relative and death alone was absolute. We ranged hither and yon, with the usual shoal of red herrings as I tried to address his objections and bring him back always to the scriptural realities of sin and salvation. He parted with my contact details, and expressed a willingness to consider getting in touch so that I could speak with him further. I hope, too, that he will accept the invitation to come to our church services and to see what kind of people are true Christians, and so learn the character of the God we serve.

His claim that we had competition (to which I will return) was further and sadly enhanced by the arrival of another local group, wild-eyed Arminians with a thoroughly worldly programme and a range of heresies to proclaim and a great deal of health and wealth to promise. They saw us, sounded us out, got their gear out about twenty yards away and planted themselves all around us. Their basic approach is to set up something like a street party, invite people to another party, and then try to sweep people further into their clutches on a wave of emotions. There is a lot of Bible speak, but not a great deal of biblical truth. The noise of their contribution bordered on the overwhelming.

Interestingly, they were drowned out by about forty devotees of Hare Krishna who were making their way into and around the centre of the town with drums, bells and cymbals. We heard them coming a way off. Given that our Arminian friends had bordered on the aggressive in their locating of themselves, a troupe of orangey chanters trampling pretty much through and over them might have caused a snigger in less high-minded chaps than ourselves. One quick-witted of our number managed to get in amongst them and hand out a few tracts, but the poor fellow was almost drowned in the tangerine tide.

It did not appear, on the surface of things, to be our most successful endeavour. It certainly underlined to us the nature of the battle. As we prayed, we asked the Lord to save those who are trapped in these godless and heretical environments, and to bring all these systems of error to nothing. As one of our number pointed out, there was something Athenian in the situation: our spirits were provoked as we saw our town given over to idols (Acts 17:16) and so we tried to reason with them, preaching to them Jesus and the resurrection by means of tracts and conversations (less so by open proclamation on this occasion, given the nature of the environment). It is interesting that all the artwork I have found of Paul in Athens gives the impression of a rapt audience seemingly enamoured of a potent speaker who has his hearers in the palm of his hand. I wonder how near or far those images are from the reality? We are not Paul, we know that, but maybe it was not quite as neat and pleasant there as some of our imaginations make out.

So, are we in competition? Are we, as my Gallic interlocutor suggested, just one of a range of equally valid voices all clamouring for attention? As I pointed out to him, we are not.

First of all, we do not compete in terms of method. We are not going to attempt to out-suave, out-dance, out-shout, and out-beat those who come with their empty messages and vain offers. We are not playing that game and we do not need to. Just because the world suggests that we are one among many in the marketplace of ideas does not mean we have to prostitute our message with the same froth and filth as everyone else. We are not competing in terms of our method.

Second, as I made clear, we are not merely offering another alternative to a range of spiritual or intellectual placebos. In that sense, we are not competing in terms of our message. Every other offer he was hearing – indeed, his own notions and his own system in which he so ardently believed – called out to mankind to look to themselves, to work harder, do better and climb higher. Ultimately, and in many cases sooner rather than later, every other one of those systems and claims will crash and burn. Ours is the one distinctive message: a call to look out and up, to look to Christ who has accomplished all, finished the work, having climbed down to save his wretched and rebellious creatures by suffering and dying in their place, exhausting God’s curse against sin and providing his own righteousness in order that we might stand before him with peace and joy. We call men away from everything else to the one true and living God, and to his Son, who loved us and gave his life for us, and rose from the dead in triumph on our behalf. We see and feel and loathe and mourn the clamour of falsehood and idolatry that swirls around us, but it is not a competition between parallel vanities. It is a battle between the truth of God and the range of damnable errors and heresies and emptinesses that masquerade as hopes for the hopeless and helps for the helpless.

May God grant that within and without the walls of our church buildings, he would give us grace to give earnest, winsome and unflinching testimonies to the truth as it is in Jesus, demonstrating in our lives the truths that we confess with our lips! May God’s message and God’s method prevail, and may the light overcome the darkness!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 17 January 2015 at 21:47

Doing and being

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It is too easy to make our witness to Christ programmatic and mechanical. There is no doubt that some measure of order and organisation is often profitable. There are many right and proper endeavours that demand structure, planning and management in order to do them well. People must be gathered and equipped, instructed or trained or encouraged, informed where to be and what to do, and so the programme begins. I am by no means suggesting that all such endeavours need to be culled – far from it!

However, could it be that too often we think of doing evangelism rather than simply being evangelists, of being fully and readily evangelical? We are, after all, gospel people, are we not? We are the ones who have been called out of darkness into God’s marvellous light in order that we might proclaim his praises (1Pt 2.9). In a sense, our witness to grace ought to be the most spontaneous, instinctive, natural thing in the world.

There are times when – because of fear, weariness, laziness, busyness, sickness, doubt or other reasons – we have to take ourselves in hand and stir ourselves up and spur ourselves and others on. Nevertheless, we should not need to be beaten into testifying of the grace of God in Christ. It bubbles out of a man like the apostle Paul under a variety of motivations, but it rarely seems to need to be drawn out, only directed as it flows.

Again, it is worth bearing in mind that we might wish to ensure that when speaking to unconverted men and women of the Lord Christ and his death and resurrection there are certain truths that we strike each time, every time, and time and time again over time. There is a certain core of truths that needs to be held up and pressed home. Here once more is something of fixed substance. But at the same time, there need be no rigidity, no dry formula, in speaking of him whom not having seen we love. It should be a ready, cheerful and unforced testimony – the sort of enthusiasm which we would struggle to quell in almost any other sphere.

And how do we cultivate this relatively artless and effortless expression? By meditating much upon the person and work of Christ, by walking closely with him, communing with him, and delighting ourselves in all he is in himself and to us.

Let us be less about doing evangelism and more about being evangelists. Let the truth flow from us readily as we go about our business. “Now thanks be to God who always leads us in triumph in Christ, and through us diffuses the fragrance of His knowledge in every place. For we are to God the fragrance of Christ among those who are being saved and among those who are perishing” (2Cor 2:14–15).

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 16 January 2015 at 23:02

The insecurity of potential missionaries

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Conrad Mbewe hits hard but fair, asking about our unwillingness to face risk for the sake of the kingdom:

My argument here is that the worthiness of a cause can be seen by how much people are willing to suffer for it. Look at the price that Jesus paid when he incarnated among us. He left the splendour of heaven knowing his destiny was not only the lonely hill of Golgotha but also years of hardship and tears. Why? It was because of the worthiness of the cause. His sacrifice was going to result in the salvation of billions and, above all, it was going to bring glory to our great God.

Read it all.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 27 December 2014 at 09:34

Church planting and the London Baptist Confessions of Faith

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Almost as soon as Calvinistic Baptists appeared on the scene in 1640s England, they demonstrated a whole-hearted commitment to evangelism and church planting. They were not alone, for many of the Puritans expressed concern for the regions of their country not yet blossoming with Gospel assemblies.[2] None of these men could be content enjoying their own privileges, but actively engaged in seeking to bring the message of Christ to others.

Good stuff from Jim Renihan in full here. It sets a standard for us today that we need more readily to embrace. In particular, we need to see our ecclesiology and our missiology more closely intertwined.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 22 July 2014 at 08:54

Ministering to the middle classes

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I am writing not from the soft streets of Niddrie but from the rocky spiritual wastelands of middle England, from the London commuter belt, from . . . Sussex! Admittedly, I live in a \’new town\’ called Crawley, which has a reputation – perhaps unfairly – for being the local sinkhole (the descendants of London\’s dregs rehoused after the Second World War), so perhaps I get a little more credibility from those who count filth and crime as badges of honour. Indeed, Crawley is so little esteemed that one of the neighbourhoods to the east of the town, a richer part of this area, has removed the name from its signs so that it does not get dragged down to our level. That said, even though it is notoriously difficult to classify the middle classes (even the BBC says so), I don\’t think that there is much doubt that I try to reach many middle class people with the gospel. Many of my labours outside the church building are either in the town square, or door to door in a neighbourhood which calls itself – perhaps inappropriately – a village. Our church planting endeavours are currently centred on an undeniable village outside of Crawley that is the very picture of middle England. All this to demonstrate that I am, largely, in the environment that Mez describes as so unpromising a field for gospel labour.

And it is.

Read the rest of my friendly rejoinder to Mez McConnell at Reformation21.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 28 January 2014 at 08:00

Posted in Missiology and evangelism

Tagged with

Effective personal evangelism: summary

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Over at Reformation21 is a series on effective personal evangelism. For ease of reference, here are the links and topics:

This is not an exhaustive list, by any means, but I am speaking out of a measure of experience myself and exposure to men I think are capable and faithful in carrying out this work. If we as individual Christians and members of gospel churches are to be effective personal evangelists, these are qualities that I think we must prayerfully pursue if we are to declare the gospel profitably and fruitfully. Not all Christians will be on the streets of our towns and at the doors of our communities. Some of us will do it sitting down over a cup of tea (other beverages are available) with a friend; some of us will do it around the dinner table or at the bedside, night after night, with our children; some of us will do it over a lunch time snack with a colleague; some of us will do it in a Bible study with our peers. However we do it, all of us have opportunities to make Christ known. I trust that these marks, rightly cultivated, will help us to be immediately effective in communicating the gospel faithfully to those who do not know our Saviour, and ultimately effective when we see God give the increase.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Monday 16 December 2013 at 14:49

Posted in Missiology and evangelism

Tagged with

What evangelism isn’t

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Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 19 November 2013 at 12:03

Ruin, redemption and regeneration

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Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 6 November 2013 at 13:47

Street preaching

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Over at Reformation21, a couple of articles on street preaching:

Enjoy!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 4 October 2013 at 18:40

Church planting in Southall

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As some of you know, the church I serve has been seeking to plant a church in a village just outside our town of Crawley. This work has brought us into and developed our contact with Pastor Barry King, who is involved in the Grace Baptist Partnership (essentially, the charitable organisation through which the church which Barry pastors seeks to pursue its church planting). Through this we came to know of a church planting project in Southall in West London, and last night we met with the three men who are heading up that work.

We are informed that Southall is home to the largest concentration of South Asian people outside the Indian sub-continent. More than 55% of the population is Indian or Pakistani. The town has ten Sikh gurdwaras, three Muslim mosques and two Hindu temples (not to mention the spiritualists around the corner). Spiritually it is a dark place, but the light is shining.

We met Vic Gill and Sonny Simak (the third brother, Sunny Kundhi, was not available) in the church building which they are hoping to buy as a home for the seedling Grace Church and a base for their gospel operations.

We were impressed by the fervour and commitment of these young men and the church they lead, and their determination and desire to have a witness for Christ in Southall. Their current concern is the purchase of the building, which they are offered at a very reasonable price, but which they need financial help to buy. This is especially significant because – as an existing church building – they already have a toehold in the town. If this building were to be bought out and the area developed, then the likelihood of obtaining planning permission for development or building of a new Christian place of worship is extremely slim.

To find out more, especially if you are interested in helping out, you can get information at the Grace Baptist Partnership Southall page or write with a request for information to gracebaptistpartnership[@]googlemail.com.

More importantly, please pray for this endeavour, that the opportunities for the preaching of Christ crucified might be taken faithfully, fearlessly and fruitfully, and that the kingdom would advance in this part of London.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 16 August 2012 at 08:42

Evangelistic preaching

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Written by Jeremy Walker

Monday 23 July 2012 at 09:59

Despised and effective preachers

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Stirring sanity from Spurgeon:

It is thought nowadays that a man must not try to proclaim the gospel, unless he has had a good education. To try and preach Christ, and yet to commit grammatical blunders, is looked upon as a grave offence. People are mightly offended at the idea of the gospel being properly preached by an uneducated man. This I believe to be a very injurious mistake.

There is nothing whatsoever in the whole compass of Scripture to excuse any mouth from speaking for Jesus when the heart is really acquainted with His salvation. We are not all called to “preach,” in the new sense of the term, but we are all called to make Jesus known if we know Him.

Has the gospel ever been spread to any extent by men of high literary power? Look through the whole line of history, and see if it is so. Have the men of splendid eloquence been remarkable for winning souls? I could quote names that stand first in the roll of oratory, which are low down in the roll of soul-winners. Those whom God has most honoured have been men who, whatever their gifts, have consecrated them to God, and have earnestly declared the great truths of God’s Word. Men who have been terribly in earnest, and have faithfully described man’s ruin by sin, and God’s remedy of grace—men who have warned sinners to escape from the wrath to come by believing in the Lord Jesus—these have been useful. If they had great gifts, they were no detriment to them; if they had few talents, this did not disqualify them.

It has pleased God to use the base things of this world, and things that are despised, for the accomplishment of His great purposes of love. Paul declared that he proclaimed the gospel, “not with wisdom of words.” He feared what might happen if he used wordly rhetoric, and therefore he refused the wisdom of words. We have need to do so now with emphasis. Let us trust in the divine energy of the Holy Ghost, and speak the truth in reliance upon His might, whether we can speak fluently with Apollos, or are slow of speech, like Moses.

via Pyromaniacs.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 3 July 2012 at 12:40

Seeing the difference of things

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I went out yesterday again to speak to the people in the village where we have been having evangelistic Bible studies. The first man I spoke to gave me an answer to which I am becoming sadly accustomed: “No . . . no . . . that’s not for me.”

I hear this so often, usually the moment someone knows that I am speaking to them about Jesus Christ. It becomes increasingly distressing the more often I hear it, and calls for prayers like this from Thomas Watson:

Oh, that the eyes of sinners may be speedily opened—that they may see the difference of things, the beauty which is in holiness, and the astonishing madness that is in sin!

HT The Old Guys.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 26 May 2012 at 08:39

The local church and evangelism

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An early incarnation of Erroll Hulse urges us to be true evangelists, embedded in local churches:

There is surely no higher motive than that of the great commission. Our Lord commanded us to teach all nations and assured us that he was with us even to the end of time. If he has commanded evangelism and promised to be with us, then that ought to be enough to spur us on. However, there are many other motives to encourage us, including the promise that the Holy Spirit will convince the world of sin, of righteousness and of judgment. The doctrine of Election is also very heartening as we know that the Father has a people which he will give to his Son and that success must crown the right use of means. Compassion is a powerful motive for evangelism. The more we are conformed to Christ the more we will be like him in goodness, compassion and concern toward his enemies (Luke 23:24).

Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 2 May 2012 at 15:46

Let there be light

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Thanks to all who prayed for the work in the village of Charlwood last Saturday.

One brother travelled down from London with the booklets and invitations, one family travelled up from Brighton, and about a dozen gathered from Maidenbower Baptist Church to distribute the material through Charlwood, directly inviting as many as we could. We divided up the village into eight zones and worked through them, making good time and finishing by about 1.30pm.

I think the consensus was that it was a good and positive day. Certainly a good number of the members here were very encouraged when I spoke with them yesterday. We probably had as many ‘very positives’ as we had ‘aggressively negatives’, with a good number of ‘polite interests’ and a fair few ‘not bothereds’. I imagine that there might be a drop-off in interest when the time comes, but if only two or three people came from each of the areas we worked through, we would still have a congregation well into double figures for the first meeting next Sunday night.

Again, thank you for your prayers. I think that they were answered even in the window of better weather than we enjoyed for the duration of the distribution: the worst of the rain eased almost as we began, and it did not really rain again until we stopped to pray at the end of the time. We now ask that having kept the earthly showers off, the Lord would send heavenly showers down! Please do continue to seek God’s blessing on the work in the coming weeks, for the salvation of souls and the establishing of a church: we are excited and perhaps a little fearful, seeking to be faithful and seeking greater faith. We value your continued intercession.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Monday 30 April 2012 at 10:56

Calvinism and missions

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An interesting interview with Kenneth Stewart on the relationship (and alleged lack of one) between Calvinism and missions here.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 21 April 2012 at 21:43

Unheralded labours

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Jim Savastio passes on a story recommended by Bill Hughes, recorded in a book called All The Blessings Of Life by F. W. Boreham. This true story is a reminder that we never know how God has blessed the seeds which we have sown through life, and ought to be an encouragement both to those more public and more private labourers whose efforts seem to involve much rocky soil:

Dr. Alexander Whyte loved to tell of a commercial traveller named Rigby who, when in Edinburgh, used to stay at the Waverley Hotel, and, on Sunday, always made his way to St. George’s. He could not preach and always found it difficult even to discuss spiritual themes with others. But before leaving the hotel for the church he always looked around for somebody whom he could invite to accompany him. One morning, on approaching a man with this invitation, he received something like a rebuff. The stranger at first refused, but finally consented, and was so moved by the service that he asked Mr. Rigby to go with him again in the evening. That night, at St. George’s, he found Christ. Next morning, in the course of his business, Mr Rigby chanced to pass the home of Dr. Alexander Whyte. Acting on a sudden impulse, he made up his mind to call and tell Dr. Whyte of his experience on Sunday. Dr. Whyte was deeply moved. “I thought,” he said, “that last night’s sermon fell very flat, and I have been feeling very depressed about it. But what did you say your name was?” Mr Rigby repeated it. “Why,” exclaimed Dr. Whyte in delight, “you are the man I’ve been looking for for years!” He then went to his study, and returned carrying a bundle of letters, from which he read such extracts as these: “I was spending a week-end in Edinburgh some weeks ago, and a fellow commercial called Rigby invited me to accompany him to St. George’s. The message of that service changed my life.” “I am a young man, and the other day I came to hear you preach, at the invitation of a man called Rigby, and in that service I decided to dedicate my life to Christ.” Dr Whyte went on to say that twelve of the letters were from young men. of whom four had already entered the ministry.

So, do what you can, where you can, however unfit you feel, and who knows what the Lord might do with your feeble words?

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 14 April 2012 at 22:19

Paul the planter

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Kevin DeYoung discusses (using Eckhard Schnabel) whether or not the apostle Paul had a church-planting strategy that focused on cities, and concludes that this is a misguided oversimplification. Here is his helpful conclusion:

So where should we go to plant churches? The short answer is: everywhere. But beyond that we should simply look at where a church is needed and where we have an opportunity to go. This will lead God’s people to many big, important cities. And to many other smaller “less important” towns and regions God cares about just as much.

Read it all.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 14 April 2012 at 16:47

Mercy for roadkill

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“What is your servant, that you should look upon such a dead dog as I?”

When our dogs die, we cry. When these dogs died, people laughed. Dogs were pests not pets. They were vermin. The only good dog was a dead dog. And that’s what Mephibosheth felt like – a splattered, stinking, dog corpse that people shuddered to look at.

Yet the king not only looked at him, but scraped him off the ground, cared for him, clothed him, fed him, and sat him at the royal table continuously.

From roadkill to a royal son. What mercy?

I wonder if Mephibosheth kept the chain of grace going?

Have you?

Read about this chain of grace and determine that you will not be the failing link.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 23 March 2012 at 12:22

The art of street-preaching

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Geoffrey Kirkland at “The Cripplegate” gives us an earnest plea for street preaching. As one who has wrestled through the pros and cons of this, and will, God willing, be out later today in the town square to declare Christ to the best of my ability, I have a lot of sympathy for his essential argument, though I might query some of his particular emphases and reasoning. He quotes Spurgeon, who said,

No sort of defence is needed for preaching out of doors; but it would need very potent arguments to prove that a man had done his duty who has never preached beyond the walls of his meeting-house.

If you click through, just bear with the unusual number of errors in the writing, and put it down to an earnest man in a great hurry as he suggests nine reasons for street preaching:

  1. It presents the gospel to people who may not otherwise step foot into a church.
  2. It allows the preacher to obey the most frequent command regarding the manner in which the gospel is presented.
  3. It follows the historical pattern of pastors open air preaching.
  4. It plainly understands the command of our Lord to “go into the highways and the country roads” and compel sinners to come.
  5. It trusts wholly that God’s Word will never return void.
  6. It encourages believers to go out together as a team and it mutually stirs others to more fervent and urgent evangelism.
  7. It convicts Christian passers-by who are not sharing their faith to consider evangelizing with greater zeal.
  8. It always glorifies God because His Word is being proclaimed.
  9. It depends wholly on the sovereign Work of the Holy Spirit to quicken dead hearts to new life as sinners hear the word preached.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 28 January 2012 at 09:21

Infamous bosh!

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Spurgeon:

Many of you, good people, try to get as far away as you can from the erring and the fallen. They might infect your innocence! Society claims that we should not be familiar with people who have offended against its laws. We must not be seen associating with them, for it might discredit us. Infamous bosh! Can anything discredit sinners such as we are by nature and by practice? If we know ourselves before God we are degraded enough in and of ourselves. Is there anybody, after all, in the world, who is worse than we are when we see ourselves in the faithful glass of the Word? As soon as ever a man believes that Jesus is the Christ, let him hook himself on to him. The moment you believe Jesus to be the Saviour, seize upon him as your Saviour.

From the sermon, “TheBelieving Thief” (MTP, #2078)

HT: My esteemed father.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 24 January 2012 at 17:00

Travailing for souls

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If any minister can be satisfied without conversions, he shall have no conversions. God will not force usefulness on any man. It is only when our heart breaks to see men saved, that we shall be likely to see sinners’ hearts broken. The secret of success lies in all-consuming zeal, all-subduing travail for souls. Read the sermons of Wesley and of Whitfield, and what is there in them? It is no severe criticism to say that they are scarcely worthy to have survived. And yet those sermons wrought marvels. . . .

In order to understand such preaching, you need to see and hear the man, you want his tearful eye, his glowing countenance, his pleading tone, his bursting heart. I have heard of a great preacher who objected to having his sermons printed, ‘Because,’ said he, ‘you cannot print me.’ That observation is very much to the point. A soul-winner throws himself into what he says. As I have sometimes said, we must ram ourselves into our cannons, we must fire ourselves at our hearers, and when we do this, then, by God’s grace, their hearts are often carried by storm.

C. H. Spurgeon, “Travailing for Souls,” 3 September 1871.

via Travailing for souls – Ray Ortlund.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 13 January 2012 at 22:35

Winning battles or people?

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The Pyros give us a little dose of Spurgeon to remind us of the difference between winning battles or arguments and souls:

I have thought it right to come amongst my fellow men, and be a man amongst men, just one of themselves, their equal and their friend; and they have rallied around me, and not refused to love me. And I should not expect to be successful in preaching the gospel, unless I might stand and feel that I am a brother, bone of their bone, and flesh of their flesh. If I cannot stand before them thus, I cannot get at their hearts.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 1 December 2011 at 08:43

Posted in Missiology and evangelism

Tagged with

Beautiful feet

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Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 30 November 2011 at 08:40

The right instrument

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“But,” says someone, “there are certain districts where you cannot do any good if you try to preach the gospel. You must fiddle to the people, and drum to them; and then you must have amusements and entertainments for them, you must have penny readings and concerts.” Very well, convert sinners that way if you can, dear friends; I do not object to any method that results in the winning of souls. Stand on your head if that will save the people; but still, it seems to me that if God’s Word is like a fire, there is nothing like it for burning its way; and if God’s Word is like a hammer, there can be nothing like that Word for hammering down everything that stands in the way of Jesus Christ. Why, then, should we not continually try the gospel, and nothing but the gospel?

From a sermon by C. H. Spurgeon, “God’s Fire and Hammer,” on Jeremiah 23.29

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:09

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