The Wanderer

As I walked through the wilderness of this world …

Archive for the ‘History & biography’ Category

Luther

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Some readers might recall the Through the Eyes of Spurgeon documentary released a couple of years back, directed and produced by my good friend, Stephen McCaskell. Well, Stephen is back on the trail, this time hoping to produce a documentary called Luther: The Life and Legacy of the German Reformer.

At the moment, he is seeking to raise the necessary remaining funds through a Kickstarter campaign. At time of writing, he’s about 25% of the way there – only another $15000 (CAD) to go. Bear in mind that this means that a $100 CAD pledge is only about £55-60 GBP or $80 USD. There’s more bang for your buck here, so you can pledge more than you think!

Here’s the promotional trailer:


If you have a minute and a few shekels to spare, please consider heading over to Kickstarter to help. The Spurgeon documentary has been viewed over 120000 times, and seems to have been much appreciated. The Luther project promises to be just as excellent and just as profitable.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 6 May 2016 at 07:39

Andrew Fuller (1754-1815)

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Two hundred years ago today, on the morning of Sunday 7th May 1815 dawned, the sixty one year old Andrew Fuller was grieved that he had not the strength to go and worship his God with his people. As his end approached, so his faith had increased. When his dear friend John Ryland Jr. heard that Fuller had testified to a brother minister, “My hope is such that I am not afraid to plunge into eternity,” he declared it the most characteristic expression his friend might have uttered.

Fuller spent his last half-hour seemingly engaged in prayer, though the only words which could be distinctly heard were, “Help me!” He died, said his friend Mr Toller, an Independent minister, “as a penitent sinner at the foot of the cross.”

Just a few days before going home, as Fuller considered his approaching death, he was able to write this to Ryland:

I know whom I have believed, and that he is able to keep that which I have committed to him against that day. I am a poor guilty creature; but Christ is an almighty Saviour. I have preached and written much against the abuse of the doctrine of grace; but that doctrine is all my salvation and all my desire. I have no other hope, than from salvation by mere sovereign, efficacious grace, through the atonement of my Lord and Saviour. With this hope, I can go into eternity with composure. Come, Lord Jesus! come when thou wilt! Here I am; let him do with me as seemeth him good!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 7 May 2015 at 15:07

Posted in History & biography

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“Through the Eyes of Spurgeon”

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Through the Eyes of SpurgeonThe release date for Stephen McCaskell’s Spurgeon documentary is looming – only one week to go. The film is going to be released online, but there will be a limited number of DVD and Blu-Rays being pressed. Please note that hard copies are only available through pre-orders made before the formal release date. If you want your own ‘proper’ copy, you need to place your order here and now.

Again, it will be available free via streaming, but hard copies need to be pre-ordered. The first showing will be at www.throughtheeyesofspurgeon.com on Thursday 18 December at 12:00am CST.

All the information you need is here. We hope you enjoy it! More than that, we hope it is a means of bringing glory to God in Christ.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 11 December 2014 at 09:34

Sore Spurgeonic eyes and feet

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Over the last week or so, I have put aside a few days to work with my friend Stephen McCaskell, who has been directing the biographical film of the life and ministry of Charles Spurgeon, Through the Eyes of Spurgeon. With Stephen have been the outstanding Matt Pennings, a quite magnificent photographer (see here and here, especially if you live in Ontario) and Director of Photography on this project, and the effervescent Brandon McCaskell, sound guy and general helper.

Stephen has been sending out updates through the film’s Facebook page and on the blog. I have to say, I have been impressed with the technical skills of these gentlemen. Of course, I have no real expertise with which to judge, but the quiet efficiency and all round competence on display, together with what looks like some great final product, gives me real hope of a happy outcome to this project. I readily acknowledge that my occasional appearance as narrator could be considered to drag the whole thing down horribly, but there’s not much I can now do about that.

There remains a great deal to be accomplished, but the last few days have been profitable, as I hope the following pictures suggest.

2014-09-16 08.45.11
2014-09-16 12.38.11
2014-09-16 13.41.13
2014-09-16 14.32.07
2014-09-10 13.21.39
2014-09-10 15.37.34
2014-09-10 15.58.27
2014-09-11 11.27.40
2014-09-12 10.35.04

Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 17 September 2014 at 23:04

“Through the Eyes of Spurgeon”

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Although I mentioned it before at Reformation21, readers here may wish to be aware of a planned biographical film of the life and ministry of Charles Spurgeon, Through the Eyes of Spurgeon. I may have some involvement in the end product, and I have been impressed with the labours of Stephen McCaskell (whose name you might know from his collection of quotations from the great Victorian, Through the Eyes of C. H. Spurgeon: Quotes from a Reformed Baptist Preacher, available at Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk).

Stephen has sent out an update through the Facebook page:

Over the last 9 months, the Through the Eyes of Spurgeon team and I have been working hard to get ready to shoot the film. Your prayers and generosity have been so appreciated by all of us. But we’ve come into a bit of a bind—after reviewing all our costs, and after fundraising a considerable amount with your help, we’re coming up about $6400 short of what we need to finish the film. Can you please help us make up this shortfall? Go to http://throughtheeyesofspurgeon.com/donate/ to donate today.

I am sure that the help of anyone who is in a position to assist would be greatly appreciated.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Thursday 31 July 2014 at 20:02

Being an historian

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Michael Haykin:

How does one become an historian? Well, the path is not an easy one. But then the learning of no skill or art is easy. It does not come through merely much reading. Nor does it come through merely much writing. There have been all kinds of journal-writers—currently prolific bloggers—but neither much writing nor much reading in themselves doth an historian make. There must be reading and there must be writing, but being prolific in either or both does not guarantee good history.

There must be discernment. There must be reflection. But before anything else there must be an attitude that takes time to be careful and precise, an attitude that is revealed in the small things of the craft. In fact, how one tackles those small things reveals the ability to handle the larger. If, with regard to the small things, the seemingly unimportant things, there is simply the desire to get them out of the way as soon as possible to make way for the truly “significant things,” the faculty of a good historian is lacking. Such an attitude is not perfectionism—an impossibility in this life for fallible humanity—though it is the desire to make everything written the best and most precise it can be.

Without precision, the faculty of taking care to be exact and right, the interest in details, there can be no good history-writing. If such a faculty is naturally present, it must be honed. If it be not present, it must be learned.

via Credo Magazine.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 20 November 2012 at 15:55

Matthew Henry

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Matthew Henry was born on 18 October 1662, not long after Black Bartholomew’s Day (24 August 1662), the date on which his father – in common with about 2000 other ministers of the gospel – was ejected from the Church of England for refusing to compromise his conscience by taking the Oath of Uniformity (binding those who took it to the prescribed forms of rite, ritual, administration of the ordinances, and prayers of the Church of England of its day). 350 years since his birth, what can we learn of his life and take from his legacy?

I try to answer this question exceedingly briefly at Reformation21. If you are interested in learning more, and will be in the London area on Monday 29 October at 1pm, I will be giving a lecture on Henry at the Evangelical Library. All are welcome.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 19 October 2012 at 16:58

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