The Wanderer

"As I walked through the wilderness of this world . . ."

Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Fuller

Wrestling with Fuller

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andrew-fuller-2For those who might be in the vicinity of Bulkington in the UK (not far from Coventry and Leicester), I hope to be at Bulkington Congregational Church this coming Monday (Mon 03 Feb) at 7.30pm for the first of this year’s church history lectures. My subject is “Wrestling: The Life of Andrew Fuller.” I will be attempting an overview of the life and labours of this man of God, drawing some particular lessons for our own day. All are welcome.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 29 January 2014 at 12:33

Blasts from the Baptist past

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Gary Brady offers us Benjamin Beddome here on what Jesus is doing now:

Christ is our advocate with the Father. His presenting his spotless sacrifice before the throne, is a powerful intercession. He also presents the prayers and supplications of the saints, without which, instead of being received with complacency, they must be rejected with abhorrence. But besides this, is there not a vocal intercession? The Scripture leads me to think that there is. Christ was that angel who pleaded for Judah and Jerusalem. “In the days of his flesh he prayed for Peter, that his faith might not fail” and he assured him, and the rest of the disciples, that he would perform the same office for them in heaven: “I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter.” And as Job evidently speaks of Christ as a Redeemer in one place, so it is not at all improbable that he refers to him as an advocate in another: “O that one” says he, “might plead for a man with God as a man pleadeth for his neighbour.” “It is,” says Dr Owen, “no ways unbecoming the human nature of Christ, in its glorious exaltation, to pray to God; for this seems to be one condition of the advancement of his interest as mediator.” “Ask of me and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession.” I have made the two last remarks chiefly because some translate the words of my text,—”Prayer shall be made by him, or through him, continually.”

And here Andrew Fuller on Scripture, of which an excerpt:

All I say, is, when the truth contained in any passage of Scripture is opened to the mind, and impressed upon the heart, this is Christian experience—this is the work of the Spirit; but it is not his work to make any new revelation to the soul, of things not provable from Scripture, which is the ease when he is supposed to reveal to us that we are the children of God, by suggesting some passage of Scripture to our minds, which expresses so much of some other person or persons, there spoken of.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Friday 20 July 2012 at 08:10

Getting Fuller right

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Ah, this is what I love about Fuller: his balance—a profound embrace of sovereign grace coupled with a passion for the salvation of sinners. These doctrines are never at odds, but companions in the extension of Christ’s kingdom.

So says Michael Haykin in correcting some wrong-headed notions about the Particular Baptist theologian.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 3 July 2012 at 12:43

Posted in While wandering . . .

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Andrew Fuller

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Steve Weaver continues his survey of Baptists you should know with a man I highly esteem, one of the first Baptists of the eighteenth century that I read with any kind of thoroughness, Andrew Fuller. Roll on the critical edition!

Written by Jeremy Walker

Tuesday 29 May 2012 at 17:36

Posted in History & biography

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Andrew Fuller and his friends

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The schedule for the 6th annual conference of the Andrew Fuller Centre is available. If you are near or can get to Louisville this September, and enjoy (Baptist) church history, this looks like a good’un.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 21 April 2012 at 21:21

Posted in While wandering . . .

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Introducing “The Andrew Fuller Review”

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One of Michael Haykin’s many irons in the fire is a replacement for the Eusebia journal called The Andrew Fuller Review. Full details can be found here, and you can read the editorial for the first issue here.

We look forward to it.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Saturday 14 April 2012 at 16:35

Posted in Book notices

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Theology and doxology

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Essentially, Fuller argued that if faith and theological reflection concerned only the mind, there would be no way to distinguish genuine Christianity from nominal Christianity. A nominal Christian mentally assents to the truths of Christianity, but those truths do not grip his heart and so re-orient his affections to glory in God. The opposite of saving faith in Scripture, Fuller noted, is not “simple ignorance,” which it would be if the Sandemanian view of faith were correct. Its opposite is an ignorance that has its roots in a deep-seated hatred of the true God. Christ can therefore state that unbelief rejects Him because, in the words of John 3:19, “people [love] the darkness rather than the light.” Likewise, Ephesians 4:18 talks about the understanding of unbelievers being darkened “because of the ignorance that is in them, because of the blindness of their heart.” Surely, Fuller reasoned, the ignorance in view here is much more than mere lack of knowledge. Does it not entail, he asked, a deepseated aversion to God and holy things?

But if unbelief comprises much more than ignorance, then faith and right theology must entail more than knowledge. If unbelief involves an aversion to the truth and a forthright rejection of the gospel, then faith in and reflection on the truth must include a love for and joy in the truth.

Michael Haykin @ Ligonier draws on Andrew Fuller, D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones and other men who knew the connection between theology and doxology to press it home into our hearts.

Written by Jeremy Walker

Wednesday 22 February 2012 at 19:05

Posted in Christian living

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